Book Review: Poirot - The French Collection

'I looked at nothing. I read nothing. I burnt the envelope without undoing the seal.'

It seems Hercule Poirot can never escape murder. Crimes, motives and killers followed him across the Orient and now they have found him again - but this time much closer to home...From seat number 9 Hercule Poirot is ideally placed to observe and enjoy the antics of his fellow air passengers. What he fails to observe, however, was the dead woman slumped in the seat behind him. When the luxurious Blue Train arrives at Nice, a guard attempts to wake serene Ruth Kettering from her slumbers. But she will never wake again - for a heavy blow has killed her, disfiguring her features almost beyond recognition. An urgent cry for help brings Poirot to France. But he never arrives too late to save his client, whose brutally stubbed body now lies face downwards in a shallow grave on a golf course. As Poirot struggles to match the pieces of the puzzle, a second, identically murdered corpse is found.

The book is a collection of three brilliant novels of the Queen of Crime- The Murder on the Links, The Mystery of the Blue Train and Death in the Clouds. Running over five hundred pages, this omnibus is certainly hefty but again, the overall presentation of the content does not compromise with the readability. Flawless plotting, gripping story line, and amazing novels characterize this collection very well.

Book Information
Author:Agatha Christie
ISBN:9780007171132
Binding:Paperback
Publisher:Harper Collins
Date of Publication:2003
Number of Pages:Approx 550 with cover


Book Review: Poirot - The French Collection

A collector's volume. I had received the copy from MySmartPrice. Thank you MySmartPrice for giving me this opportunity. You can buy this book at flipkart  in case you live in India. 
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Book Review: The Sad Demise of Manpreet Singh

It was late - too late to call - but Dom knew what he had to do.
Dominic 'Biscuit' McLeod is an expert in making the best of a bad situation. As a visa fraud investigator at the Australian High Commission, New Delhi. Biscuit is legendary for his prowess in drinking beer, playing cricket, and swearing like a Dilliwalah, until the tragic death of a junior colleague forces him to become something else - a conspiracy theorist who can't let go. Armed with only a hangover, a loathing for authority, and an inability to believe the lies that he is being told, Biscuit stumbles from crisis to catastrophe in a shambolic search for the truth. From the villages of Punjab to the cricket fields of Delhi, and the walled compounds of Gurgaon and Chanakyapuri, with dodgy visa agents, crooked cops, Aussie journalists, Afghani pimps and American spies for company, it looks like Biscuit will never solve the case, or leave the party early.

With an ambitious plot and an easy narrative style, The Sad Demise of Manpreet Singh is a novel about the things people will do to leave the places they don't want to be - and the lengths others will go to try and stop them. With fast and gripping story line, and well developed characters - the book is interesting and will definitely appeal to readers of the genre.

Book Information
Author:Patrick Bryson
ISBN:9789350097403
Binding:Paperback
Publisher:Hachette India
Year of Publication:2014
Number of Pages:Approx 320 with cover


Book Review: The Sad Demise of Manpreet Singh


Good Read. I had received the review copy from Hachette India. Thank you Hachette India for giving me this opportunity. You can buy this book at Flipkart in case you live in India.
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Book Review: The Mongol Empire

In Chinese eyes, Genghis and Kublai and all their conquests were actually Chinese, And so therefore is Tibet.
The Mongol Empire changed the course of history and transformed the map of the world. Driven by an inspiring vision for peaceful world rule, Genghis Khan - mass murdering barbarian to his victims, genius and demi-god to his people - united warring clans and forged an empire that spanned Asia, bringing people, cultures and religions together and opening intercontinental trade. Under his grandson, Kublai Khan, the vision evolved into a more complex ideology, justifying further expansion. Fuelled by the belief that Heaven had given the whole world to the Mongols, Kublai doubled the empire's size until, in the late thirteenth century, he and his family controlled one-sixth of the world's land area. Along the way, he conquered China, made Beijing his capital and gave the nation the borders it has today, establishing the roots of the twenty-first century superpower.

In very lucid prose John Man presents an authoritative account of the rise and fall of Genghis's Golden Family. With vivid descriptions of the era, the author succeeds in conjuring up the essential flavors of the volatile time period. The Mongol Empire by John Man is a fast, gripping and resourceful book and is an essential read if you are interested in this particular time period of history in general and the personality in particular.

Book Information
Author:John Man
ISBN:9780593071250
Binding:Paperback
Publisher:Random House India
Year of Publication:2014
Number of Pages:Approx 400 with cover


Book Review: The Mongol Empire

Fast, gripping and resourceful. I had received the review copy from Random House India. Thank you Random House India for giving me this opportunity. You can buy this book at Flipkart in case you live in India.
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